<div dir="ltr"><div>Hi all,<br><br></div><div>@Drew Latta: I was wondering why the end members should be magnetite and maghemite. Is it because they are both of inverse-spinel structure, the difference only being that the latter has all Fe completely oxidized into Fe(III)? Would you be able to provide the standard spectra to me if that is the case? Thanks very much!<br>
<br></div><div>Previously I have only thought of using hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) and FeO as end-members, both representing Fe(III) and Fe(II) respectively without giving much thought to the structure Fe takes. I also had my doubts using magnetite (Fe3O4) as a standard as it is a mixture of both Fe (II) and Fe (III). But thanks to the insights Drew has given, I now think I should take the Fe-coordination environment into account with the use of magnetite and maghemite as standards.<br>
<br></div><div>@Alexandre and Matthew: I have obtained Mossbauer spectra of some of my samples but like Drew said, it is not straightforward at this point in time. Will see what I can do with the data I have!<br><br></div>
<div>Thanks for all your responses! It is greatly appreciated! This forum has been more helpful than I thought!<br><br>Teck Kwang<br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 13 August 2013 01:34, Matthew Marcus <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:mamarcus@lbl.gov" target="_blank">mamarcus@lbl.gov</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">While it's true that Mossbauer is the gold standard for Fe valence determination, access to the technique isn't all that common, and I don't know<br>

of any facility that can do it on a micro scale.  Is there one?<br>
        mam<div class="im"><br>
<br>
On 8/12/2013 7:01 AM, Alexandre dos Santos Anastacio wrote:<br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">
Hello,<br>
<br>
maybe that fingerprinting technique would be Mossbauer spectroscopy. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio comes easily and also there are lots of papers about Mg-ferrite, an example:<br>
<br></div>
10.1109/TMAG.2009.2018880 <<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMAG.2009.2018880" target="_blank">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/<u></u>TMAG.2009.2018880</a>><br>
<br>
Alexandre.<div class="im"><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Ifeffit mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Ifeffit@millenia.cars.aps.anl.gov" target="_blank">Ifeffit@millenia.cars.aps.anl.<u></u>gov</a><br>
<a href="http://millenia.cars.aps.anl.gov/mailman/listinfo/ifeffit" target="_blank">http://millenia.cars.aps.anl.<u></u>gov/mailman/listinfo/ifeffit</a><br>
<br>
</div></blockquote><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Ifeffit mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Ifeffit@millenia.cars.aps.anl.gov" target="_blank">Ifeffit@millenia.cars.aps.anl.<u></u>gov</a><br>
<a href="http://millenia.cars.aps.anl.gov/mailman/listinfo/ifeffit" target="_blank">http://millenia.cars.aps.anl.<u></u>gov/mailman/listinfo/ifeffit</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">Teck Kwang Choo</span><br>PhD Student<br>Department of Chemical Engineering<br>Room 225, Building 36<br>Monash University<br>
Mobile No.: 04-11489904<br>
</div>