<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Oct 25, 2010, at 8:25 AM, Wayne W Lukens Jr wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">A more useful way to look at this is that the probabilities that A, B and C are present are 99.99999999%, 93%, and 77%, respectively.</span></blockquote></div><br><div>An excellent post, Wayne, but I don't think that last statement is quite right. If the F-test gives a probability of 0.23 for material C, I believe it's saying that there is a 23% that, given the noise level in the data, the fit would indicate that C was present when it was not. That is <i>not</i> the same thing as saying there is a 77% chance of C being present. </div><div><br></div><div>To see this, imagine very, very noisy data. Including C in the fit might very well improve the fit in the sense of an R-factor--maybe, in fact, there's a 45% chance of a modest improvement with a given set of very noisy data, even if there's no C present. That does not mean that a result like that should lead to the conclusion that C is more likely than not present (55%).</div><div><br></div><div>--Scott Calvin</div><div>Sarah Lawrence College</div></body></html>