<pre>I have read some references of Kelly Shelly, and I have got some idea of how to <br>construct a structure without difinite crystalline structure. But when I try to<br>apply to my own question, meet some difficulties.<br>
<br>In my case, four nitrogen atoms is surrounding a iron atom. So I use  OVERLAP and SS card as <br>to define such system as described in the FEFF manual:<br>--------------------------------------------------<br>POTENTIALS
<br> *    ipot   Z  element            <br>        0   26   Fe                <br>        1   7    N                <br>* Determine approximate overlap for central and 1st nn in Cu<br>OVERLAP 0 *determine overlap for central atom of Fe
<br>  *iphovr novr rovr * ipot, number in shell, distance<br>   1     4    2.15<br>OVERLAP 1 *determine approximate overlap for 1st shell N<br>  *iphovr novr rovr * ipot, number in shell, distance<br>   0        1    2.15<br>
*SS index ipot deg rss<br>SS  1     1    4   2.15<br>--------------------------------------------------<br>but feff8 stopped and said:<br>                              Absorbing atom coords not specified.<br>                             Cannot find multiple scattering paths.
<br>since the OVERLAP does't need ATOMES card, where can I define the coordination of absorbing atom?<br>Is there any other CARD needed for such situation?<br><br><br>=========================================<br> Hi Jun,
<br>That keyword is explained here:<br>  <a href="http://feff.phys.washington.edu/feff/wiki/index.php?title=OVERLAP">http://feff.phys.washington.edu/feff/wiki/index.php?title=OVERLAP</a><br>I think the problem is that you have not specified the SS keyword:
<br>  <a href="http://feff.phys.washington.edu/feff/wiki/index.php?title=SS">http://feff.phys.washington.edu/feff/wiki/index.php?title=SS</a><br><br>I use the overlap/ss thing in feff very infrequently.  My preference<br>
is to start from a known structure that is somehow similar to the<br>material I am investigating.  For example, if I were to look at<br>amorphous germanium, I would use crystalline germanium as my starting<br>point.  I would then construct the model in such a way that I
<br>parameterize the differences between the starting structure and what I<br>expect to find in the data.<br><br>I'd recommend reading papers by Scott Calvin or Anatoly Frenkel on<br>nanoparticles or by Shelly Kelly on uranium in biogeochemical systems
<br>for excellent examples of how that sort of analysis is done.<br><br>Hope that helps,<br>B<br></pre><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences<br>No. 2019, Baojia Road,
<br>Jiading District, Shanghai,China 201800